Culture Picks

Here it is, the second most anticipated event of your week (the first of course being rain, or at the very least a cool breeze). So, assuming you have made it through the heat of the past seven days without melting into a decidedly sweaty sleep-deprived pool, you are now free to claim a cultural reward for your suffering. Yep, it’s time for the ice-cool refreshment that is our arts experts’ picks of the current cultural landscape. 

 

Kate Prince: Every Move She Makes

chosen by Ruth Hardie, Interim Head of Public Programming

Kate Prince's ZooNation rehearse at the Southbank Centre

Groove on Down the Road was one of the first performances I saw in the Queen Elizabeth Hall after starting work at the Southbank Centre and I fell in love with the style and creativity behind it. Kate Prince, founder and Artistic Director of ZooNation: The Kate Prince Company and ZooNation Youth Company – who are Youth Company in Residence here at the Southbank Centre – is a dance pioneer. Her company and choreography have transformed the profile of Hip-Hop and Street Dance and inspired new generations of dancers. This documentary gives behind the scenes insight into what goes into making such a complex original dance show.’

watch on BBC iPlayer

 

 

I Saw The World End

chosen by Cliff Lauson, Senior Curator, Hayward Gallery

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Imperial War Museums (@imperialwarmuseums) on

‘This new digital commission by the Imperial War Museum marks a significant and tragic moment in Japanese and world history – 75 years since atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As a collective 'reading', the work gives visual form and voice to texts drawn from a number of perspectives, including survivors. 

‘Out of respect for all those affected by the recent explosion in Beirut, the artwork’s launch was relocated from a large public location to a much more modest presentation within the Museum. There, it provides a contemplative space for reflection on the past and on all such catastrophes.’

(aspects of I Saw The World End contain graphic language and first-hand accounts of the atrocities so discretion is advised)

IWM: I Saw The World End

 

 

Jan Enkelmann: Lockdown London

chosen by Glen Wilson, Senior Content Editor, Digital

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Jan Enkelmann (@janenkelmann) on

‘In the early weeks of lockdown, back when ‘Thursday, 8pm, “Clap”’ was the only thing in our diaries, photographer Jan Enkelmann began taking his camera on his nightly cycling excursions across London. The images he captured have now been curated online in a captivating collection entitled Lockdown London, offering a chance to see the city in a way few of us would have experienced before. “Maybe these photos are less about the lack of human presence and rather about the stillness of a city being allowed a breather to reveal a beauty that often goes unnoticed,” suggests Enkelmann. Either way, his images offer a welcome sense of peace at a time when so much seems to be in constant flux.’

Lockdown London

 

 

So You Think You're Funny? Best Bits

chosen by Pax Lowey, Comedy Programmer

So You Think You're Funny? Best Bits - Episode 1

‘Each Thursday night throughout August, Edinburgh Fringe institution the Gilded Balloon is releasing compilation shows with never-before-seen highlights from their comedy newcomer competition So You Think You're Funny?

‘This week's episode features an astounding line-up of household names, showing them on the cusp of breaking through to mainstream success — including Aisling Bea, Sarah Millican, Seann Walsh, Doc Brown, Maisie Adam, and Zoe Lyons. With the big names due to continue in later episodes with comedians such as Netflix megastar Hannah Gadsby.

‘These performances do include strong language and explicit anecdotes, along with occasionally lively audience members — but for those of us missing live comedy, it's lovely to experience these again!’

Gilded Balloon on YouTube

 

The show must go on(line)

Sadly, for everyone’s safety, our venues are currently closed. But you can still get your Southbank Centre fix online. We will continue to share inspiring and thought-provoking arts stories through our website and social channels.

follow us on Twitter
follow us on Facebook
follow us on Instagram

As a charity, we rely on ticket sales for a huge chunk of our income. But now they’ve stopped. And it's a huge worry to us, and the people we work with. We all need the escape of art and culture; it can inspire and unite us. So please – if you can afford to – consider a donation to the Southbank Centre today, to help us be there for you in the future.

Inside jokes: Comedy in lockdown

While lockdown has slowly started to ease, most of us are still spending more time inside than we ordinarily would, and are probably running out of entertainment ideas too!

So to help you out, Southbank Centre’s Comedy Programmer Pax Lowey has drawn up a list of recommendations of old and new comedy, from stand-up recordings and virtual chat shows to sitcoms and radio specials. There’s sure to be something for everyone!

 

The Lou Sanders International Chat Show

rent for £7

Taskmaster series eight winner Lou Sanders recently launched an online chat show featuring games, songs and invasive questions. The second episode has not long aired and is now available to rent for just £7, with £2 from each rental going to food banks around the UK.

This episode features a bumper nine guests, including Sara Pascoe, Mae Martin, and Steen Raskopoulos. Will any of them guess What’s In The Dish?

watch the episode

 

 

 

Sorry

BBC iPlayer

This comedy short created by Lolly Adefope tells the story of the similarly named Dolly Adesina — an actress on the way to the premiere of her first Hollywood film. During the journey she discovers that she is trending on Twitter for all the wrong reasons, putting her career in jeopardy.

Sorry is a fantastic response to ‘cancel culture’, exploring themes of intent, regret and redemption — and will make you want to check what you have previously posted online…

watch Sorry on BBCiPlayer

 

 

Wangsplaining

BBC Sounds

British-Malaysian comedian Phil Wang grew up on the island of Borneo and in this radio pilot he dwells on the British Empire. As a self-identified centrist, Wang disagrees with the polarised views surrounding the legacy of colonialism and discusses this with his parents. A particular highlight is when he tackles the contentious issue of the Elgin Marbles!

listen to Wangsplaining

 

 

Chewing Gum

All4

TRAILER: Chewing Gum | Available On All 4

Before this year’s smash hit I May Destroy You, Michaela Coel created this BAFTA Award winning sitcom. Chewing Gum is about Tracey Gordon: a religious, Beyoncé-obsessed 22-year-old trying to learn about the world (and sex) by losing her virginity — and nothing is off-limits or taboo! If you’re missing your weekly instalments of I May Destroy You, this is a brilliant alternative.

watch Chewing Gum on All4

 

 

Mae’s House Party

rent for £6

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Mae Martin (@hooraymae) on

On 21 June, Mae Martin gathered her funniest friends for an online house party featuring improv, live music, and poetry. Mae’s House Party features two hours of entertainment with contributors including Meg Stalter, Charlotte Ritchie, Adam Hess, John Kearns, Jordan Stephens (Rizzle Kicks), Sabrina Jalees, and Aaron Chen.

Though the chance to join the party live may have passed, you can rent the show on demand for £6 with all proceeds going to Black Minds Matter.

join Mae's House Party

 

 

The One and Only Herb McGwyer Plays Wallis Island

via Moxie Pictures

This 2007 short film tells the story of jaded folk singer Herb McGwyer travelling to Wallis Island to play an exclusive gig, taking him on a journey that reignites his passion for music.

Written by and starring Tim Key and Tom Basden, The One and Only Herb McGwyer Plays Wallis Island won Best British Short film at Edinburgh International Film Festival 2007 — and was also nominated for Best Short Film at the BAFTA Awards.

watch the film online

 

 

Jordan Brookes: Bleed

rent for £4

Jordan Brookes: Bleed trailer

A year before winning the Edinburgh Comedy Award, self-proclaimed “riskiest comic in the biz” Jordan Brookes created Bleed — an intense and unsettling comedy show inspired by 2017 psychological horror film Mother!

Brookes eschews the traditions and conventions of comedy, playing with narrative and structure to explore his ego. The result is a truly boundary-pushing immersive experience with innovative sound design — and straddles the border with performance art. 

Bleed is only available on Soho Theatre On Demand for a limited period. Headphones recommended.

watch via Soho Theatre on demand

 

 

The show must go on(line)

Sadly, for everyone’s safety, our venues are currently closed. But you can still get your Southbank Centre fix online. We will continue to share inspiring and thought-provoking arts stories through our website and social channels.

follow us on Twitter
follow us on Facebook
follow us on Instagram

As a charity, we rely on ticket sales for a huge chunk of our income. But now they’ve stopped. And it's a huge worry to us, and the people we work with. We all need the escape of art and culture; it can inspire and unite us. So please – if you can afford to – consider a donation to the Southbank Centre today, to help us be there for you in the future.

Five things to know about Among the Trees

After months of closure, we’re thrilled that Hayward Gallery is reopening. Our exhibition Among the Trees brings together artworks by 37 artists who explore our relationship with trees and forests. Find out what to expect from this forest of art.

It takes us all around the world – from Colombian rainforests and remote Japanese islands, to the streets of New York City – and presents us with astonishing things

...including a cast of a 2,000-year-old olive tree from southern Italy, and an ancient underground forest in South Africa photographed by Rachel Sussman as part of her decade-long project to document the world’s oldest living things.

 

Ugo Rondinone, cold moon, 2011, at Among the Trees, Hayward Gallery, 2020  © Ugo Rondinone 2020. Courtesy of Hayward Gallery. Photo: Linda Nylind

 

There are artworks that push at the very limits of the building, and celebrate the soaring scale of trees

Eija-Liisa Ahtila’s huge, cinematic portrait of a 30-metre spruce, for example, takes over almost the entirety of one of the lower galleries, while Guiseppe Penone’s Tree of 12 Metres (1980–82), a sapling painstakingly excavated from an industrially planed piece of timber, stops just short of the ceiling. Upstairs, Viriginia Overton has covered one of the gallery walls in vibrantly coloured planks of Eastern red cedar taken from trees that surround her family farm in rural Tennessee. 

 

Giuseppe Penone, Tree of 12 Metres, 1980–82, at Among the Trees, Hayward Gallery, 2020 © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2020. Courtesy of Hayward Gallery. Photo: Linda Nylind

 

The artists in this exhibition explore new ways of thinking about our connection to trees and forests, and the role they play in our lives and imaginations

Eva Jospin transforms the gallery into an enchanted wood with her towering forest made entirely from cardboard; Mariele Neudecker presents us with an eerily illuminated underwater forest with her sculpture And Then the World Changed Colour: Breathing Yellow (2019); while artists including Sally Mann, Steve McQueen and Jimmie Durham address how entwined trees are with our history, politics and everyday lives.

 

Eva Jospin, Forêt Palatine, 2019-2020, at Among the Trees, Hayward Gallery, 2020. © Eva Jospin 2020. Courtesy of Hayward Gallery. Photo: Linda Nylind

 

It spans the past 50 years – a period that coincides with the emergence of the modern environmental movement

And includes early works by Robert Smithson, a pioneer of the land art movement, alongside recent artwork by some of the most innovative and inventive artists working today, which ask us to consider the human impact on arboreal life, and our environment more broadly.

 

At once thought-provoking and therapeutic, this exhibition encourages us to appreciate the beauty and complexity of trees and forests

And to lose ourselves – momentarily – in artworks that range from Jennifer Steinkamp’s hypnotic video-installation of a birch grove cycling through the seasons, to Toba Khedoori’s intricate, almost hallucinogenic, drawings and paintings of dense networks of branches, roots, and leaves. After months of lockdown, the chance to go tree-bathing in the Hayward Gallery is surely more welcome than ever.

Jennifer Steinkamp, Blind Eye, 1, 2018, at Among the Trees, Hayward Gallery, 2020 © Jennifer Steinkamp 2020. Courtesy of Hayward Gallery. Photo: Linda Nylind

 

Among the Trees at Hayward Gallery reopens to the public on 1 August. 

The exhibition is open on Wednesday – Saturday, 11am – 7pm and Sunday, 10am – 6pm; and closed on Monday and Tuesday. You must book online before visiting.

find out more

 

Header image: Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Horizontal – Vaakasuora, 2011, at Among the Trees, Hayward Gallery, 2020 © Crystal Eye, Helsinki, 2020. Courtesy of Hayward Gallery. Photo: Linda Nylind

 

As a charity, we rely on ticket sales for a huge chunk of our income. Though Hayward Gallery may now be reopening, our auditoriums remain closed. We all need the escape of art and culture; it can inspire and unite us. So please – if you can afford to – consider a donation to the Southbank Centre today, to help us be there for you in the future.

Resident and Associate Orchestra round up

One of the most fascinating aspects of lockdown life has been seeing the way in which musicians have adapted to the restrictions placed upon them in order to ensure the music plays on. In this round up we see the realisation of lockdown easing before our eyes, as pieces performed in isolation by artists from Chineke!, and the BBC Concert Orchestra give way to socially distant recitals from the Philharmonia and London Philharmonic orchestras. 

Plus, the Aurora Orchestra offer two tales of two cities, the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment take inspiration from Bach; the London Sinfonietta get up close with contemporary clarinet and the National Youth Orchestra show how a Mighty River can provoke similarly mighty conversation.

Summer Sessions: Wind

from the London Philharmonic Orchestra

Summer Sessions are here!

After months of playing apart, the London Philharmonic Orchestra have finally come back together again to deliver four online concerts. This Summer Session series began on 15 July with Strings, and continues on Wednesday 29 July at 7.30pm with the second concert of the quartet, Wind. In a performance live streamed for free on YouTube the LPO Wind section performs chamber music by Mozart, Rossini and Janáček.

more about LPO Summer Sessions

 

 

Sheku performs Saint-Saëns

from the Philharmonia Orchestra

Philharmonia Sessions: Sheku performs Saint-Saëns

Like the LPO, the Philharmonia Orchestra have also launched a new series of online performances, beginning with this celebration of string playing recorded at Battersea Arts Centre. Star cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason performs Saint-Saëns’s lyrical Cello Concerto No. 1.

The special 50 minute home concert also sees John Wilson conduct one of the nation’s favourite pieces, the Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis. Vaughan Williams’s rhapsodic masterpiece is well suited to socially-distanced performance – with musicians divided into two mini-orchestras and a string quartet, and placed as far apart as possible, to weave a web of luminous sound around the listener.

see all Philharmonia Sessions

 

 

The Science of Laughter

from the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment

The Science of Laughter | Bach, the Universe & Everything

For their online series Bach, the Universe and Everything, the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment have drawn on the environment of St Thomas church in Leipzig where, from 1723 until his death in 1750, Bach produced innovative music for the weekly services. In the spirit of the church’s congregation – who were open to new ideas, and bound by faith – each edition offers a thought-provoking cantata and a talk from a leading scientist.

In this concert Neuroscientist Dr Sophie Scott discusses the science of laughter and why we instinctively try to make each other laugh to get through difficult times. Whilst Bach's BWV 113 – in which laughter can be heard in the Chorale and Recitative, with a burst of playful semiquavers in the continuo cello – provides the cantata.

 

 

Introduction to Contemporary Clarinet

from the London Sinfonietta

Lockdown Live - Introduction to Contemporary Clarinet

In their Lockdown Live series London Sinfonietta players have been diving into the nuances of contemporary performance on their instruments, and exploring how they are used in a contemporary setting. In this particular video, London Sinfonietta principal clarinettist Mark van de Wiel explores contemporary writing for clarinet, with a focus on the clarinet solo from Olivier Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time.

London Sinfonietta’s Lockdown Live series

 

 

Four Places

from the Aurora Orchestra

FOUR PLACES

This film-infused broadcast from the Aurora Orchestra pairs two contrasting responses to places in America: Charles Ives’ haunting ode to New England, and a vivid portrait of New York by Michael Gordon and Bill Morrison. The film initially premiered on YouTube on Sunday 12 July as part of the orchestra’s Aurora Play digital series.

Aurora Play digital series

 

 

BBC Radio 2 House Music Sessions

from the BBC Concert Orchestra

Radio 2 House Music - Nell Bryden with the BBC Concert Orchestra - Sirens

Launched during lockdown to enable Radio 2 listeners to continue to enjoy live music during lockdown, House Music Sessions sees performers team up with the BBC Concert Orchestra from their home.

This video features Nell Bryden performing a special arrangement of her 2012 song Sirens. Other House Music Sessions performers include Jack Savoretti and Melanie C.

BBC Concert Orchestra House Music sessions

 

 

Filmed in Lockdown: No Human Is An Island

from Chineke! orchestra

Harpist Ruby Aspinal, who appears in the film for No Human is an Island

Commissioned by the BBC as part of their Culture in Quarantine programme, ‘No Human is an Island’ is a song and short film by Tom Hickox, featuring Chineke! Orchestra. Written two weeks into lockdown, the song draws on John Donne’s iconic poem of the same name, echoing the need for community and physical contact in human life. 

Recorded and produced under lockdown the film, directed by Grammy nominated Nicolas Jack Davies, allows us to see each concert musician performing the song out of context, in their own home.

watch the performance

 

 

Mighty River 

from the National Youth Orchestra

NYO Music Trail

Last month #BlackoutTuesday saw music-lovers flood social media with black squares to show support for racial justice and equality in the music industry and beyond. Prompted by this, the National Youth Orchestra’s community of young people have chosen to explore, learn and discover music by a more diverse range of voices.  

As a musical starting point, the NYO will rehearse and perform Mighty River; a piece by Belize-born British composer Errollyn Wallen, which explores the history of the slave trade in Britain, with spirituals and gospel music at its core.   

The piece also offers a jumping off point for contextual discussions: as the NYO take the opportunity to educate themselves, and the young people in our community, to be alive to a range of viewpoints and stories, and equip them with an understanding to foster a more equal way forward in the sector. You can follow their journey on the hashtag #NYOMightyRiver. 

find out more

 

As a charity, we rely on ticket sales for a huge chunk of our income. But now they’ve stopped. And it's a huge worry to us, and the people we work with. We all need the escape of art and culture; it can inspire and unite us. So please – if you can afford to – consider a donation to the Southbank Centre today, to help us be there for you in the future.

The show must go on(line)

Sadly, for everyone’s safety, our venues are currently closed. But you can still get your Southbank Centre fix online. We will continue to share inspiring and thought-provoking arts stories through our website and social channels.

follow us on Twitter
follow us on Facebook
follow us on Instagram

we’re back
:
The Hayward Gallery is open again with our critically acclaimed exhibition Among the Trees. Don’t forget to book online in advance – see you there.

Among the Trees returns

Among the Trees | Hayward Gallery

Finally, some good news. After more than 20 weeks closed due to the Coronavirus pandemic, Hayward Gallery and its Among the Trees exhibition is reopening to the public on 1 August.

With inspiring works from 37 artists, Among the Trees celebrates and reimagines how we think about trees and forests. By turns poetic, adventurous and thought-provoking, the exhibition invites us to consider trees as both cultural symbols and living organisms.

 

Nature has played a large part in our lives throughout the pandemic, and I am delighted that the public will once again have the opportunity to see this exhibition which invites us to think about the inspiring roles that trees and forests play in our lives and imaginations.
Ralph Rugoff, Director of Hayward Gallery

In line with government guidelines and best practice shared from colleagues at galleries and museums across the UK and Europe, the Hayward Gallery will reopen with fully assessed and implemented health and safety measures in place.

how we’ll be keeping you safe

 

Hayward Gallery, and Among the Trees, will be open five days a week (11am – 7pm Wednesday - Saturday, and 10am – 6pm on Sunday), from Saturday 1 August. All visitors must pre-book.

find out more

 

Hayward Gallery to reopen to the public with Among the Trees exhibition and offering free tickets for NHS staff

After more than 20 weeks closed due to the Coronavirus pandemic, the Hayward Gallery will reopen five days a week with Covid-secure health and safety measures in place to keep visitors and staff safe

  •  NHS workers and Southbank Centre Members can visit for free and tickets are just £5 for under 30s and Lambeth residents
  •  All visitors are asked to pre-book their ticket at southbankcentre.co.uk;
  • Among the Trees will later be joined by a new free outdoor exhibition, Everyday Heroes , from September to November . The art and poetry exhibition across the Southbank Centre’s 11-acre site celebrates key workers and ordinary people who have risen to the occasion during the crisis

read the full press release

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Drum, listen, sing! Exploring music at home

Whether you need ideas to help keep you going through lockdown, or you’re looking at ways to fill the summer holidays; after four months at home we could all do with some music in our lives. So we’ve pulled together this neat selection of activities and performances from our friends and partners, offering different ways you can participate in and enjoy music together as a family at home.

Groove Into the Woods: A video storybook

recommended for ages 3-7

Groove Into the Woods: A Video Storybook

Welcome to the deep, dark woods - full of all sorts of magic and creatures up to no good... Join three friends on their quest to save their grownups from some horrible trolls. Singing, dancing and adventure await you on this mysterious journey.  

This is a shorter, video retelling, of the live Groove Baby show Groove Into the Woods which we were lucky enough to have at the Southbank Centre as part of our Imagine Children’s Festival earlier this year. Created by musician Cameron Reynolds, Groove Baby is a series of family concerts featuring interaction and story telling for little ones and great music for everyone! With an almost live band, musical interaction and 3D animation, this is a great performance piece for the family to enjoy and dance to together.  

 

 

Mmm Ahhh Whoosh: Sounds of the Song by Mellow Baku 

recommended for ages 0-5

Good Morning Sing My Song

We were very lucky to have the incredibly talented jazz and soul singer and songwriter, Mellow Baku, perform her album for children and toddlers at this year’s Imagine Children’s Festival. Her groovy sounds include acoustic guitar, live looping, spoken word, roots, jazz and soulful folk songs, accompanied with friendly animations. And now they’re available online for you to sing along and enjoy with your babies and toddlers at home. We bet you wont be able to stop singing some of these for days, they’re so catchy!

 

 

Jamboree with Oily Cart

Jamboree | The Sensory Sessions

Friends of the Southbank Centre, Oily Cart, reimagine theatre for young audiences to make it more inclusive. They create sensory theatre that can be enjoyed by children that are very young and those who are labelled as having complex needs, including those with profound and multiple disabilities, with an autistic spectrum condition, and those who are deafblind and multi-sensory impaired. Inspired by a recent piece of gig-theatre they made with teenagers with profound and multiple learning disabilities, Oily Cart have put together Jamboree, which features sensory activities to try at home, including shadows, movement and sound based ideas.

 

 

Samba with Benedetti Foundation

recommended for age 6 and upwards

The Benedetti Foundation, founded by award winning violinist and friend of the Southbank Centre Nicola Benedetti, have a huge range of online tutorials for different ages and ability levels. Why not try out this session on samba at home and as a family learn the rhythms for some simple samba grooves. No need to seek out an actual drum, just bang a pot or an upside down bucket with your hands or a wooden spoon, or simply clap along.

 

 

Lullaby Sonic Cradle

designed for ages 0-5, but great for all ages

Before her live performance at the Southbank Centre in February, artist Supriya Nagarajan said to us  that the biggest compliment she could get from audiences members, children and adults alike, was that they fall asleep! 

Inspired by the songs Indian women sing to their babies while working in the fields, Lullaby: Sonic Cradle is a semi-improvised performance from Supriya, combining night time sounds, vocals and instruments with a soundscape designed by sound artist Duncan Chapman. Set the mood at home with comfy cushions, dim the lights and meditatively listen and relax as a family whilst playing this ambient album.

 

 

Tots Tunes - SoundsCreative Projects

recommended for ages 0-5

Led by Cellist and founder of SoundsCreative Projects Tara Franks, this Hackney based community class is now online so you can start your day with a shake, stomp and sing. Original tunes, rounds and world folk songs are included, with a few dance moves thrown in, accompanied by cello and djembe. This is a class as much for adults as little ones and will be lots of fun for all.

more information on their classes

 

The show must go on(line)

Sadly, for everyone’s safety, our venues are currently closed. But you can still get your Southbank Centre fix online. We will continue to share inspiring and thought-provoking arts stories through our website and social channels.

follow us on Twitter
follow us on Facebook
follow us on Instagram

As a charity, we rely on ticket sales for a huge chunk of our income. But now they’ve stopped. And it's a huge worry to us, and the people we work with. We all need the escape of art and culture; it can inspire and unite us. So please – if you can afford to – consider a donation to the Southbank Centre today, to help us be there for you in the future.

Colour Me A Rainbow

Over the past few months we’ve seen rainbows decorating the windows of houses across the country as a symbol of thanks and celebration of the nation’s key workers. Taking this as our inspiration, we’ve pulled together some colorful activities for you to engage with at home. There are art classes and digital apps, story reading and early years song and rhyme sessions; all of them inspired by colour. We hope you enjoy them. 

White: The App

recommended for ages 2-4

White The App

Internationally acclaimed Catherine Wheels Theatre Company have joined with Hippotrix to create the world's first children's app inspired by theatre. White invites you into an enchanting world where eggs fall from the sky and colours come to life. Based on hit children's show White, this digital toy is designed for parents and very young children to enjoy together.

download the app

 

The Day The Crayons Quit

The Day the crayons quit - Books Alive! Read Aloud book for children

Watch and listen to this version of Drew Daywalt and Oliver Jeffers’ incredible book The Day The Crayons Quit on Books Alive. And then, once it’s finished, ask your little ones to come up with a story about each of their favourite crayons, or draw a picture using their colours in different ways.

Books Alive is a popular YouTube channel bringing classic and new children's stories to life with colour and imagination. All of their ad revenue generated by the channel is donated to charities, events and organisations that encourage young people to read.

 

Bookbug's Rainbow Fun

recommended for ages 0-2, and 3-5

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Scottish Book Trust (@scottishbooktrust) on

The Scottish Book Trust have released a whole range of resources to help parents run their own Bookbug sessions at home. They include a selection of colourful songs and rhymes inspired by those beautiful rainbows in the windows of houses across the country – spreading hope and happiness at this difficult time.

The resources are available for different age groups, under five, and will help you have your own fun session at home with your children. They contain links to a hello song, rhymes and songs to share face to face and get you on your feet, a storytime video, and some calming music to finish with. That’s calming for both you and your little ones.

online Bookbug session resources

 

Strickson's Super Special Art Club

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Rebecca Strickson (@rebecca_strickson_illustration) on

Join illustrator and designer Rebecca Strickson via Zoom for an art class in your home. She makes use of simple materials and different themes for you to have fun exploring art, design and your own creativity. There are different classes for different ages including a Little Creative class for under 7s and a Bigger Creatives for older children (there’s also an adult class too). Rebecca sends out details about each week’s class in advance via email and on her Instagram.

join Rebecca Strickson’s mailing list

 

Storytime: David McKee reads Elmer

Time for Storytime: David McKee reads Elmer

Possibly one of the most famous colourful animals in the whole of the animal kingdom; it’s Elmer the elephant! Watch and listen to author David McKee reading the book of his much-loved creation. Did you know David appeared at our Imagine Children’s Festival in 2019 to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of Elmer?

 

 

The show must go on(line)

Sadly, for everyone’s safety, our venues are currently closed. But you can still get your Southbank Centre fix online. We will continue to share inspiring and thought-provoking arts stories through our website and social channels.

follow us on Twitter
follow us on Facebook
follow us on Instagram

As a charity, we rely on ticket sales for a huge chunk of our income. But now they’ve stopped. And it's a huge worry to us, and the people we work with. We all need the escape of art and culture; it can inspire and unite us. So please – if you can afford to – consider a donation to the Southbank Centre today, to help us be there for you in the future.

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