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Angela Davis: women, race and class in the post-Trump era

Angela Davis: women, race and class in the post-Trump era by Southbank Centre: Think Aloud

In March 2017 we were very lucky to welcome writer, scholar, philosopher, and activist, Angela Davis to the Southbank Centre as part of WOW - Women of the World. Known internationally for her ongoing work to combat all forms of oppression in the USA and beyond, Davis is a living witness to the historical struggles of the contemporary era.

Davis’ appearance here at the Southbank Centre came just two months after she was made honorary co-chair, and appeared as a featured speaker, at the Women’s March on Washington, which followed Donald Trump’s inauguration as President.

In this podcast, she talks to Southbank Centre’s Artistic Director, and founder of WOW, Jude Kelly, about women, race and class in the post-Trump era.

 

It’s true that in many ways structurally racism is more powerful than ever before, but if we don’t acknowledge that conditions have changed, what we’re saying is that the work that we do makes no difference at all. The conceptual tools young people have today for thinking on how we move in the direction of freedom are based on the decades and decades of struggle, and so yes, we have made progress.
Angela Davis

The show must go on(line)

Sadly, for everyone’s safety, our venues are currently closed. But you can still get your Southbank Centre fix online. We will continue to share inspiring and thought-provoking arts stories through our website and social channels.

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As a charity, we rely on ticket sales for a huge chunk of our income. But now they’ve stopped. And it's a huge worry to us, and the people we work with. We all need the escape of art and culture; it can inspire and unite us. So please – if you can afford to – consider a donation to the Southbank Centre today, to help us be there for you in the future.

Zing Tsjeng on journalism, climate change and championing women

If you’ve read or listened to anything so far in 2020, chances are you’ve taken in the words of Zing Tsjeng. Executive Editor of VICE UK, Tsjeng also writes for The Guardian and Time Out (among many others); is host of BBC podcast Obsessed With... Killing Eve, and the author of the four-book series, Forgotten Women.

From Brexit to the beauty industry, prostate orgasms to ‘posh people getting absolutely smashed at the races’, it’s fair to say Tsjeng has touched on a broad spectrum of subjects for VICE UK. But one topic cropping up with increasing regularity is climate change. As Tsjeng told ace & tate in a 2019 interview, “I don’t think our levels of consumption, especially in the UK, can carry on as they are without really seriously damaging the environment”.

And it is the topicality of climate change that brings Tsjeng to us at Southbank Centre. In April she chairs the panel talk Eco-Anxiety: How to Cope with a Changing World; part of our Reading the Mind series, exploring mental health and well-being through literature. In anticipation of her visit we caught up with the journalist and author to discuss her field, her book series, and whether we should feel ‘climate guilt’.

 

What led you into journalism? Was it something you always wanted to do?

I didn't realise it till quite late on – I was a journalist at my student paper, but it was almost too much fun for me to realise that this was something you could actually do as a job. I only started considering it seriously after I won a Guardian Student Media award at university. 

 

The nature of journalism is always evolving, what do you think is the most vital quality to have as a journalist in 2020?

I don't think the essential traits that make a good journalist have changed, although the platforms that journalism is put out on are changing all the time. Tenacity, a good news sense, an ability to write and cut through the noise to understand the real story – those are still necessary in 2020. 

 

How we consume our news, and stories, has changed dramatically in the past decade; has the growth of social media made it harder or easier for news platforms such as VICE to reach their audience?

I think it's easy to think of news organisations competing with social media for eyeballs, but in my experience, it has actually allowed us to reach new audiences on the platforms where they spend all their time. 

 

In 2018 you published your Forgotten Women series of books, detailing the overlooked stories of prominent female figures. There is no doubting the series was needed, but was there a particular catalyst that made you say ‘I need to write these’?

I just thought ‘it's now or never’. The interest in excavating women from history was at an all-time high, and I wanted to put something out that was rigorously written, researched and delivered with heart. 

 

Zing Tsjeng - Forgotten Women

What has the reaction to the books been? Have any reactions taken you by surprise?

Some of the best reactions have been the most unexpected. People have come up to me and said that their relatives' lives crisscrossed with the lives of the women in the books – someone told me that they'd attended the Grunwick protests led by trade unionist Jayaben Desai, and another told me that her grand-au to had worked in Bletchley Park. It's always such an honour to know that I've written about people who have touched so many others.   

 

Journalist, editor, author, podcast host… you’re an incredibly busy person - how do you find the space and time to focus?

I sleep eight to nine hours a night (seriously) and if I don't get that amount of sleep, I immediately find myself feeling cranky and stressed. I'm told that this is an insane amount of sleep, but I think the whole ‘sleep less to maximise your efficiency’ is absolute BS. 

I sleep eight to nine hours a night.I'm told that this is an insane amount of sleep, but I think the whole ‘sleep less to maximise your efficiency’ is absolute BS.
Zing Tsjeng

You’re joining us for our Reading the Mind series, chairing a talk on eco-anxiety. Is ‘eco-anxiety’ something you have found yourself feeling?

Definitely. I've written about it for VICE and Time Out. I grew up in Singapore, which is a very green country, and have always loved nature and wildlife. But it's only been in the last year or so that I've realised that my experience growing up puts me in the minority, and, given the way the planet is going, is likely to get even rarer still.

 

As well as anxiety, there is perhaps a propensity to feel a level of guilt around our own actions around climate change. Should we feel guilty? And, are there things we can do to help stave off this guilt?

I think it's important to caveat that individual consumers will never bear as much responsibility for polluting the planet as much as, say, Exxon-Mobil. There's always more we can do, obviously, but part of the solution requires us to channel our guilt productively and start getting angry with the companies and institutions that have let us down. 

 

And lastly, in terms of your own interaction with the natural world, I’ve read that you’re a keen gardener. What’s the appeal of gardening for you?

It's an excellent way to unplug. Anybody who's tried to use their phone with gardening gloves on knows what I'm talking about.

 


 

The show must go on(line)

Sadly, for everyone’s safety, our venues are currently closed. But you can still get your Southbank Centre fix online. We will continue to share inspiring and thought-provoking arts stories through our website and social channels.

follow us on Twitter
follow us on Facebook
follow us on Instagram

 

 

As a charity, we rely on ticket sales for a huge chunk of our income. But now they’ve stopped. And it's a huge worry to us, and the people we work with. In difficult times, we all need the escape of art and culture; it can inspire and unite us. So please – if you can afford to – consider a donation to the Southbank Centre today, to help us be there for you in the future.

Interview by Glen Wilson

 

Climate change: from activism to anxiety

From the devastating wildfires of Australia, to the activism of Greta Thunberg and the divisive tactics of Extinction Rebellion, the topic of climate change is rarely far from the news in 2020. And so as public awareness, and indeed the threat of the impact of climate change, grow, we’re hosting a series of talks, discussions, and poetry events around the topic.

Timed to coincide with the Hayward Gallery exhibition, Among the Trees, this series features promising poets and leading voices on the future our planet faces, and what we can begin to do to make a difference.

Guppi Bola, writer and activist
Thu 19 March | Purcell Room

Resist: Decolonising Climate Conversations

Escape the despair of the current climate and ecological crises, with stories of hope from communities that have relocated to the UK. Writer and activist Guppi Bola leads a panel discussion featuring people who can offer a vision of a climate-just world through stories of their lived experience, surviving in the face of environmental adversity.

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Anna Selby, author
Wed 25 March | Hayward Gallery

National Poetry Library Lates

Celebrate Hayward Gallery’s Among the Trees exhibition, in an evening of poetry inspired by the natural world. The spring edition of our regular late-night poetry salon features poet and naturalist Anna Selby, alongside other emerging and established poets and spoken word artists performing in the relaxed and intimate space of our Hayward Gallery Cafe.

find out more

Mon 6 April | Purcell Room

Eco-Anxiety: How to Cope with a Changing World

Eco-anxiety is a newly coined term for the anxiety that arises from feelings of hopelessness surrounding climate change. Discussing this, and how we can look to cope with a changing world are Karen Larbi – founder of POC In Nature and the Co-Founder of support group Black Woman Heal United Kingdom – and leading psychoanalytic psychotherapist Rosemary Randall. Journalist, author and executive editor of VICE UK, Zing Tsjeng (pictured) chairs the panel.

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David Wallace Wells, journalist
Wed 8 April | Queen Elizabeth Hall

David Wallace Wells: The Uninhabitable Earth

In July 2017 David Wallace-Wells published a cover story in New York magazine surveying the landscape of worst-case scenarios for global warming. The article received an instant global reaction, leading Wallace-Wells to expand on his points further with the book The Uninhabitable Earth. The author joins broadcaster Samira Ahmed to reflect on this book, and the debate about climate change it prompted. 

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Dara McAnulty
Thu 16 April | Purcell Room

House on Fire: Young People on Climate Change

Leading young voices on climate change come together to discuss the work they’re doing to raise awareness about the future of the planet. Speakers include multiple award-winning activist and writer Dara McAnulty (pictured), Action for Conservation Ambassador Yetunde Kehinde, and Anna Taylor, climate activist and co-founder of the UK Student Climate Network.

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L Kiew, poet
Wed 22 April | Hayward Gallery

Leaving the City: Poets on Trees

Hear from ten poets, including L Kiew (pictured), Mona Arshi and Seán Hewitt, as they come together in Hayward Gallery to present poems specially commissioned in response to our exhibition Among the Trees. Move through the exhibition at your own pace and hear the poems read in different locations throughout the gallery.

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Among the Trees, an exhibition that brings together artworks that explore our relationships with trees and forests, is at Hayward Gallery, 4 March – 17 May.

find out more

 

Rescuing poetry from the edge of extinction

As anyone who maybe trying to follow British politics can certainly attest; a lot can happen in two years. At the last instalment of Poetry International, our long-running biennial festival, the National Poetry Library launched their Endangered Poetry Project in an attempt to preserve the poetry of languages on the verge of dying out. Fast forward two years and that same project has manifested into an anthology, Poems from the Edge of Extinction, which was officially launched at Poetry International 2019.

Political upheaval, climate breakdown, genocide, war, the enduring impact of colonialism; these are just some of the many things which can see a language come under threat, and face potential extinction. This groundbreaking anthology, edited by National Poetry Librarian Chris McCabe, brings together poets from each continent to both highlight the pressure their languages are placed under in an increasingly globalised world, and celebrate their work as poets and activists.

Ahead of the book’s launch event, and 2019’s Poetry International, we caught up with Chris McCabe to understand more about the initial project, and how it evolved into the publication of Poems from the Edge of Extinction.

 

Southbank Centre: So Chris, what initially prompted the Endangered Poetry Project?

Chris McCabe: The project was in response to the reports by linguists that half the world's languages could be lost by the end of the century. This set us thinking about what this meant for poetry, and if we could play about in collecting, sharing and even activating interest in the poetry cultures inherent in these languages.

 

Was an anthology always the natural outcome of the Endangered Poetry Project?

This wasn't the aim to begin with. We first of all set about collecting poems for the library, and focussing our 2017 Poetry International around this theme. In the summer of 2018 we asked artist Mary Kuper to create new artworks in response to some of the European poems we have collected, which led to the Language Shift exhibition at the National Poetry Library. It was only when Emma Green, a commission editor from Chambers, got in touch with the proposal for manifesting the project as a book, that we realised that we had the makings for a great anthology.

 

Lost languages MUSIC

 

Was there ever a point at which your work began to cross over from compiling an anthology to becoming a kind of endangered language poetry detectorist?

The work of editing the anthology might be my biggest undertaking of literary detection! The process involved deep research across collections, the internet and the SOAS Endangered Languages Archive, trying to find leads to endangered languages in which their poetry culture had been documented. My proudest moment as editor of this book was persevering with my attempt to find a poem in Patua, the critically endangered language of Macau in China, and eventually receiving a comment from Miguel S Fernandes on Facebook, who told me he was the last person writing poetry in that language.

 

The Endangered Poetry project asked for people to submit their poems, were there any languages you were surprised to receive poetry in?

I was particularly surprised to find a poem submitted in Kristang, a Portugese-influenced, Creole language spoken in Malaysia. Even better to find that this poem by Martha Fernandez was a love poem to the Kristang language itself, in which she writes 'I know you ... Today you are a part of me'. I'm so pleased to have included this poem in the book.

 

You mentioned Miguel S Fernandes as being the only poet writing in Patua; presumably there are others too who are now the only person writing poetry in their language. What does it mean to share one of their poems out to a wider audience?

Yes, another example is John Smelcer, who writes in the Alaskan, Ahtna language. Smelcer is thirty years younger than the next fluent speaker, and has made it his work to document the language, creating dictionaries and teaching words form Ahtna on YouTube. It is an honour for me to have been in contact with poets like this, who have spent their lives as activists for the language they care about so deeply, and to be able to make a contribution to sharing their work with more readers.

 

It’s an honour to have been in contact with poets who have spent their lives as activists for the language they care about so deeply, and to be able to make a contribution to sharing their work with more readers.
Chris McCabe

 

How did you decide on which poems and languages, from the many received, to feature in the anthology?

As with any editing project I had to draw on my lifetime's experience as a reader of poetry to inform my decisions, yet this book is particularly unique in that in some cases there was only one documented poem to draw on from a particular language. In these instances my decision wasn't about assessing 'literary merit' in the sense we are taught at western universities, but to present this language and poetic culture as a window into a kind of verbal art that might be very different from what readers of poetry anthologies are used to.

 

How much would these poems lose in translation to languages that are more widely spoken across the globe; be it English, Spanish, Mandarin or French?

I never see translation as a form of loss, but as a gift given to us by the world's translators. We all gain from every new translation, which is a unique work of art in its own right.

 


 

 

The anthology Poems from the Edge of Extinction, edited by Chris McCabe is available to buy now, from the Southbank Centre Shop.

buy a copy

And, if you know a poem in an endangered language, you can still contribute to the Endangered Poetry Project

find out how

 

Southbank Centre's Book Podcast: American Dreams in the time of Trump

American Dreams in the time of Trump by Southbank Centre's Book Podcast

In a special edition of Southbank Centre’s Book Podcast, introduced by Head of Literature and Spoken Word Ted Hodgkinson, we bring together the thoughts and insights of an array of acclaimed American authors, all of whom joined us for the 2018 London Literature Festival and a strand of events ahead of the United States’ midterm elections.

Over the course of this episode you’ll hear from leading novelists Marilynne Robinson and Salman Rushdie, author and professor, Sarah Churchwell, and poet Terrance Hayes on the construct and constraint of modern America under Donald Trump, and the historical currents that brought us here. You’ll even hear a few anecdotes about personal encounters with the 45th president of the United States. 

  

There’s anger everywhere we look. If anger is a form of heartbreak, it just makes the person a bit more human as opposed to something you can kill… we shouldn’t eliminate or destroy an enemy because that might not be the best way to fix it.
Terrance Hayes, poet, on humanising the political divide


The show must go on(line)

Sadly, for everyone’s safety, our venues are currently closed. But you can still get your Southbank Centre fix online. We will continue to share inspiring and thought-provoking arts stories through our website and social channels.

follow us on Twitter
follow us on Facebook
follow us on Instagram

As a charity, we rely on ticket sales for a huge chunk of our income. But now they’ve stopped. And it's a huge worry to us, and the people we work with. In difficult times, we all need the escape of art and culture; it can inspire and unite us. So please – if you can afford to – consider a donation to the Southbank Centre today, to help us be there for you in the future.

 

Subscribe to Southbank Centre's Book Podcast via your preferred podcast provider to enjoy more interviews and insights from well-known names, including Anna Burns, Khaled Hosseini and Matt Haig.

Why are women in politics subjected to abuse online? WOW 2018 podcast highlights

In the Line of Fire: Women politicians and online abuse by Southbank Centre: Think Aloud

Online abuse cuts through party lines, affecting women from across the political spectrum. Why have threats of death, rape and other violence become a daily occurrence for many women in politics? What should we do about it? How do you cope if you’re in the line of fire?

Speakers including MPs Jo Swinson, Anna Soubry, Tulip Siddiq, and leader of the Women's Equality Party, Sophie Walker share their experiences.

Please be aware that this podcast contains language which some listeners may find offensive.

The intention is to shut us up. Forever people have been trying to shut up women; and we will not be shut up
Anna Soubry, Conservative MP for Broxtowe, Nottinghamshire

WOW 2019 takes place at Southbank Centre on 8 –9 March, 2019 with talks, events, discussions and workshops for all ages.

find out more

 

Join the WOW conversation on Twitter

#WOWLDN

 

Can theatre help us understand the culture of surveillance and fear?

Ever feel like you’re being watched? Quite often there’s a reason for that. Particularly when you’re online (hello). Dr. Andrew Westerside, Co-Artistic Director of Proto-type Theater describes how our increasingly nonchalant compliance with outside access to our online life led to the creation of their performance piece A Machine they’re Secretly Building, which comes to Southbank Centre this month.

A Machine They're Secretly Building
Image courtesy of Fenia Kotsopoulou, Proto-Type Theater

Making an hour-long performance that tackles global mass-surveillance head-on might be the single most difficult thing I’ve ever tried to do in theatre.

In 2015, as part of Proto-type Theater (along with my collaborators Rachel Baynton, Gillian Lees, and visual artist, animator and designer Adam York Gregory), I started to make A Machine they’re Secretly Building: a performance that grew from our shared feelings of outrage and disbelief at the mass-surveillance of private citizens.

Even for people actively interested in the avalanche of documents and memos unearthed in the wake of Edward Snowden’s 2013 leaks, at the core of them lay a very trivial obstacle: they were all incredibly boring. A dizzying amount of impenetrable jargon, code-words, numbers, neologisms, cross-references and countless redactions that made unpacking and unpicking their magnitude a colossal task.

Our job, as theatre makers, seemed not to be one in which we ought to give the documents a context, or a fiction to breathe in, but one in which we had to translate and expose the facts, to present them in raw, human terms. With people. Together. In a room.

The information, we realised, was supposed to be boring, boring and impenetrable by design. To kill the interest, as well as the conversation.

Even with the complexity of the facts aside, how could we begin to understand  global mass-surveillance, culturally as well as theatrically, in a contemporary context? We can (and should) easily forgive ourselves for rapidly scrolling through (or even outright ignoring) the pages and pages of terms & conditions that come as part and parcel of the tools that keep us moving and together. Across Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Skype, DropBox, Twitter, and countless other services, we’ve created a network of information and sociability that’s shrunk the world down into a small rectangle we keep in our pocket. And, as we catalogue our digital self in near real-time through images, statuses, running routes and dating preferences, so too have we made normal the idea of surveillance to such an extent that self-surveillance is a habitual part of twenty-first century life.

For a while, people have been tossing around George Orwell’s 1984 as a model for understanding the current surveillance environment, but really it’s a toxic combination of 1984 and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, where the drug of choice is ingeniously embedded within the mechanisms of surveillance itself
Sarah Bay-Cheng, writing in Performance Research: a journal of the performing arts, in 2014

In short, if we want to get involved in this new world, we’re going to have to get used to being watched. It’s a trade, then. An exchange. That’s why we ignore those T&C’s. But what we didn’t know, before the Snowden revelations, was the horrifying extent of the trade – what we were really giving away.

We didn’t know that people had openly lied, some under oath, about the illegal bulk collection of our (your, my) data. Our emails, photos, bank balances, location histories, messages, call data. All harvested, all stored. Just in case. We didn’t know that the UK and US security services were taking, and storing, images from every single live Yahoo! Webchat around the world, every five minutes, for at least six years. We didn’t know that in the UK our internet history is available without a warrant to a staggering fifty-eight different agencies, including the Royal Navy and the Food Standards Agency. We didn’t know. We didn’t sign up for that.

But now we do know, and still the tide doesn’t seem to be turning. Why? How is it that in late-2017, a full four years after the Snowden revelations, there has been next-to-no legal action, prosecution, or parliamentary reform with regards to mass-surveillance?

A Machine they're Secretly Building
Photograph courtesy of Adam York Gregory, Proto-Type Theater

Quite possibly the single most influential factor, and something A Machine… doesn’t shy away from, is the leverage afforded to the security services by the atrocities of 9/11. Of course, one can genuinely sympathise with a government that wants more tools at their disposal to avert such a tragic loss of life. But what began with the US Stellar Wind programme and Patriot Act in the immediate aftermath of September 2001, as emergency measures, was also the opening of a door just wide enough to allow in the most potent and malleable of human emotions; fear.

In a turbulent age of 24-hour news, global political friction and unrest, the re-emergence of the far right across Europe, Brexit, and the ever-present threat of an act of international terror (the UK’s threat level hasn’t dropped below ‘substantial’ in the last eleven years, and is mostly ‘severe’ or ‘critical’), it’s easy to see how ready we are to welcome the insidious machine of surveillance in with open arms. But look closely, and the world we’re sold doesn’t quite match up with the facts.

You may have already heard impassioned defences of mass-surveillance that begin or end with the argument that ‘if you’ve done nothing wrong, you’ve got nothing to hide’. The logic is easy to follow: good, kind, thoughtful folk like you and me – aside from perhaps some minor misdemeanours – pose no threat to national safety. They’re not looking for us; we’re the haystack the needles are hiding in. If it keeps us safe, if it keeps us alive and well, why should it matter?

The answer is quite simple. If you think you’re being watched, your behaviour changes. Over time, the possibility for revolution and revolt, for protest and dissidence, vanishes. Over time, the ability to even think of a different state of affairs, a different world, vanishes, too (a kind of ‘non-thinking’ that Henry Giroux terms disimagination).

As a small collection of citizens who happen to also make theatre, we’re not happy that our government is and has been indiscriminately spying on us. We want you to know what’s happening. What we need to realise, collectively, is that once we’ve let state-sanctioned mass-surveillance in, it’s very very difficult to ask it to leave.

A Machine they’re Secretly Building isn’t a performance that has all the answers, but it is, I hope, one that starts to ask the right questions.


 

Proto-type Theater’s A Machine they’re Secretly Building is a performance piece that charts a course from the Top Secret secrets of WWI intelligence through to 9/11, the erosion of privacy, Edward Snowden and the terror of a future that might already be upon us. It was performed at Southbank Centre, in Royal Festival Hall’s Blue Room, in November 2017.

Take a look at Southbank Centre's performance and dance programme.

upcoming performances

Africa: Feminism and the Future - Africa Utopia 2017 podcast

Africa: Feminism and the Future by southbankcentre

How do feminists in Africa and the diaspora envision the continent’s future? Speakers in our panel discussion from Africa Utopia include Fatimah Kelleher, women’s rights and social development activist.

How do feminists in Africa and the diaspora envision the continent’s future, how are they leading the fight for change, and what individual and collective solutions are there in response to the challenges ahead?

Our speakers explore the struggles women experience in their personal, political, economic and cultural lives. Featuring Fatimah Kelleher, women’s rights and social development activist; Jessica Horn, Director of Programmes at the African Women's Development Fund; and Nana Darkoa Sekyiamah, Ghanian feminist activist, writer and blogger.

Africa Utopia is Southbank Centre's annual festival celebrating the arts and culture of one of the world's most dynamic and fast-changing continents.

More podcasts from Africa Utopia
 

We shape the future, so believe in your power and believe in your collective power.
Jessica Horn, Director of Programmes at the African Women's Development Fund

Africa Utopia 2017 best bits podcast

Highlights from Africa Utopia Festival 2017 by southbankcentre

In this 30-minute highlights podcast you'll hear all about how African nations will define their place in a changing global and political landscape being shaped by Brexit and President Trump.

Speakers include Tech entrepreneur, Tom Illube  Powerlist's most influential black person in the UK and co-founder of ebook publishing house Bahati Books Kudakwashe Kampuira with some comedy from Daliso Chaponda who shot to fame as a runner-up on Britain's Got Talent.

Africa Utopia is Southbank Centre's annual festival celebrating the arts and culture of one of the world's most dynamic and fast-changing continents.

More podcasts from Africa Utopia
 

Until lions have their own historians, tales of the hunt will always favour the hunter. We have to tell the story of Africa in the way that we want to tell it, in order for people to hear a different perception.
Tom Ilube, tech entrepreneur

Young, African & breaking the mould: Africa Utopia 2017 podcast

Young, African And Breaking The Mould by southbankcentre

Africa has the youngest population in the world, with over 200 million people between 15 – 24-years-old. Hear from young Africans who are leading the way in everything from tech to fashion and activism. 

In this podcast from our 2017 Africa Utopia festival, talented young speakers include: UK plus size style influencer Stephanie Yeboah; co-founder of ebook publishing house Bahati Books Kudakwashe Kampuira; founder of sociarchitecture.com kuukuwa Manful; and poet Remi Graves. Chaired by poet and playwright Inua Ellams.

More podcasts from Africa Utopia
 

That's why I came to poetry, a place for the status quo to be questioned.
Remi Graves, poet and drummer

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